Sdl scale texture

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Sdl scale texture

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The dark mode beta is finally here. Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. Can anyone explain to me in simple words what is the difference between texture and surface? Both are collection of pixels. But I do not see the main difference between them has to do something with GPU? I tried to google it but all explanations I found were too complex to understand them without digging deeper into computer graphics stuff.

With software rendering, as saloomi correctly noticed, you are using regular RAM to store image data. Thus, in most cases you can access data buffer associated with surface directly, modifying its content, i. Needless to say that hardware rendering is by orders of magnitude faster than software rendering and should be always be considered as primary option. As mentioned in the last lesson, textures are the GPU rendering equivalent of surfaces. This function more or less does what you'd expect—the parameters are the rendering context and a surface to create the texture from.

As with other creation functions, it will return NULL on failure. Learn more. Asked 6 years, 2 months ago. Active 1 year, 11 months ago. Viewed 29k times. Take a look at my answer here: stackoverflow. Did that answer your question? Here is your chance. Active Oldest Votes. Basically your assumption "has to do something with GPU? Petr Abdulin Petr Abdulin Timmos Hardware rendering is always going to be faster than software.

However, there is one advantage to a software surface: since it is stored in CPU-accessible main memory, you can directly write data to it. This can be useful if you want to generate a texture in real-time, for example as procedurally generated content in video games.

Mind, though, that nowadays many types of procedural generation can also be done on the GPU using shaders. Timmos You have full control over the way that surfaces are worked on, generated, full read write control, I mean really Surfaces use your RAM and Textures use your video card that is more fast than the surfaces.

Evander Evander 66 6 6 bronze badges.

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I hope it helps you!Scaling, resolution and pixel art Dids. Hi everyone, I'm working on a PC-only game Windows, Mac and Linuxbut I'm running in to a few snags with choosing the correct resolution, and handling the scaling. Each tile is 16x16, with the tilemap's size currently at 40x26 tiles. I'm also using nearest pixel sampling, by the way. Now, in theory this all seems perfect, and should afaik support the majority of users out there, with the minimal resolution of x Any help would be greatly appreciated!

As I haven't gotten any replies, I'll try to elaborate or simplify the issue. Would I be better off implementing the black bars by myself both horizontally and verticallyor am I missing something here? I made a quick image that shows the stretching at different resolutions. Thank you very much! For some reason I wasn't even thinking that most displays are anyway, so why not target that.

I'll have to see if this resolution is enough for the game so it doesn't impact gameplay, but if it does, I'll try my best to roll my own scaling solution. Thanks again, always helps to have a second set of eyes look at a problem. If you want smart scaling, you really have to do it yourself. Use whatever screen resolution makes the most sense for the device e. Choose an aspect ratio for your main playing viewport independently from that. When you calculate scaling factors, scale your playing field so it's scaled to the size of the minimum screen dimension.

The screen's aspect ratio then doesn't matter at all except that it shows more or less of the area beyond your main play area which you can treat either like letterboxing, show unimportant decoration, or show more of the action around the main view focus. The trouble is that it's kinda a lot of work and mess unless you design your code to hide the scaling factors.

sdl scale texture

I'm also not sure how well it would work for getting precise pixels rendered. Dids Joined: 21 Apr Posted: Tue Apr 21, pm. Posted: Sat Apr 25, am.

David Olofson Guest. Posted: Mon Apr 27, am. Posted: Sat May 02, am. Jonny D Joined: 12 Sep Posted: Sat May 02, pm.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Game Development Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional and independent game developers. It only takes a minute to sign up.

I wanted to know if it was a good idea and if there was any way instead of individually resizing each texture, all relationships of space, and fixing the proportions of the speed for each object to take the tiny scene of little sprites and tiles and rescale it before the image blits on the screen. If there's a more reasonable solution, someone tell me, but this seems to make the most sense to me. The way I go about it when making pixel art game is the one you were hinting at: work at 1x resolution sprites are not upscaledand scale everything at the end.

If you want to scale only certain bits let's say, HUD layeryou could render everything to a texture, and then upscale that texture before rendering it to the screen.

Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Asked 4 years, 9 months ago. Active 4 years, 9 months ago. Viewed 6k times. Thanks for the help! Cuppasoup Cuppasoup 1 1 silver badge 5 5 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes. Once this is done, you can just treat the window as being exactly of that size, and SDL will take care of upscaling the result if the window is bigger than the logical scale you set the renderer to be.

You should use "nearest" the documentation has a list of the exact option names.

sdl scale texture

Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook. Sign up using Email and Password. Post as a guest Name. Email Required, but never shown. The Overflow Blog. Featured on Meta. Community and Moderator guidelines for escalating issues via new response…. Feedback on Q2 Community Roadmap. Linked 3. Related Texture Manipulation. Here we're adding new functionality to the texture class.

We have a function to get the raw pixels and a function to get the pitch. The pitch is basically the width of the texture in memory. On some older and mobile hardware, there are limitations of what size texture you can have. If you create a texture with a width of pixels, it may get padded to pixels wide the next power of two. Using the pitch, we know how the image is in memory.

In terms of data members we have a pointer to the pixels after we lock the texture and the pitch. To allow ourselves the ability to edit the texture, we have to load our textures differently. First we have the load the image as a surface like before.

After the texture is created we have to manually copy the pixels from the surface to the texture. The first argument is the texture we'll be grabbing pixels from. The second argument is the region we want to grab pixels from and since we're getting the pixels from the whole texture we set this argument to NULL. The third argument is the pointer that will be set to the address of the pixels and the last argument will be set to the texture's pitch. After we have the texture's pixels, we copy the pixels from the surface to the texture using memcpy.

The first argument is the destination, the second argument is the source, and the third argument is the number of bytes we'll be copying.

Fortunately, the pitch SDL gives us is the number of bytes per row of pixels so all we have to do is multiply by the height of the surface to copy in all the pixels from the image. After the texture is unlocked the pixel pointer is invalid so we set it to NULL. With the pixels from the surface copied into the texture, we then get rid of the old surfaces and return true if the texture loaded successfully.

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Finally here are the accessors to get the pixels and pitch while the texture is locked. In our media loading function after we load the texture we lock it so we can alter its pixels.

After the texture is locked, we're going to go through the pixels and make all the background pixels transparent. What we're doing is essentially manually color keying the image.

We then need to grab the pixels. Our pixel accessor returns a void pointer and we want 32bit pixels so we type cast it to a 32bit unsigned integer. Next we want to get the number of pixels. We get the pitch which is the width in bytes. We need the width in pixels and since there are 4 bytes per pixel all we need to do is divide by 4 to get the pitch in pixels.

Then we multiply the pitch width by the height to get the total number of pixels. First we map the color key color and the transparent color using the window's pixel format.

Then we go through all the pixels and check if any of the pixels match the color key. If it does, we give it the value of a transparent pixel. After we're done going through the pixels we unlock the texture to update it with the new pixels. Download the media and source code for this tutorial here. Back to SDL Tutorials.Welcome to LinuxQuestions. You are currently viewing LQ as a guest. By joining our community you will have the ability to post topics, receive our newsletter, use the advanced search, subscribe to threads and access many other special features.

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Click Here to receive this Complete Guide absolutely free. I'm looking to port an SDL 1. Any good tutorials yet? If not I guess I'll wait until then to port it. This is annoying. There seems to be some linear scaling part of SDL2, but who wants that? I can post the program I am trying to port, it's not very long. Alright, I found a decent tutorial, so I will mark this solved. Fixed it up in 10 minutes after looking over the tutorial.

Mostly just search and replace stuff. EDIT: Here's something weird tho. While messing with the rendering system I was able to cause Xorg to hang with 'EQ overflow' or something like that. Oh well. Last edited by metaschima; at PM.

This took me a while to figure out. Thread Tools. BB code is On. Smilies are On.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Game Development Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional and independent game developers.

It only takes a minute to sign up. I am working on a game with SDL2 and having trouble turning off linear filtering when upscaling textures.

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My game has a bunch of 32x32 tiles. However, when the the whole scene is upscaled to fit the actual screen, it seems to be interpolated blurry. I did that, but nothing seems to change at all. It returns true and it is in fact changing the hint, but the rendering just doesn't change at all.

I even tried setting it with priority but nothing changes. This is because interpolation mode is a property of created textures, not the rendering pipeline. Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Ask Question. Asked 2 years ago. Active 2 years ago. Viewed 1k times. Any idea how to fix this? I am on Windows if that's relavent. It didn't seem to make a difference.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

sdl scale texture

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However I have encountered a huge issue involving scaling to resolution. I want the the game to look nice in full HD so all the images for the game have been created so that the natural resolution of the game is x However I want the game to scale down to the correct resolution if someone is using a smaller resolution, or to scale larger if someone is using a larger resolution.

The problem is I haven't been able to find an efficient way to do this. And since my animations are contained in one image when the animation would play the animation would slightly move up or down each frame. Then after some looking round I have tried using opengl to handle the scaling. It then converts this surface to a opengl texture, scales this texture to the screen resolution, then draws the texture. This works fine visually but the problem is that its not efficient at all.

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Currently I am getting a max fps of 18 :. So my question is does anyone know of an efficient way to scale the SDL display to the screen resolution? It's inefficient because OpenGL was not designed to work that way.

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Main performance problems with current design:. My recommendation: switch your application completely to OpenGL. This removes the need to render to a texture and copy to the screen--just render directly to the screen!

This is the ideal solution to your problem. Now, it comes with the one major drawback that you have to recode everything with OpenGL draw commands which is work, but not too hard, especially in the long run. Short of that, you can try the following ideas to improve speed:.

Learn more. How to scale to resolution in SDL? Ask Question. Asked 7 years, 10 months ago. Active 7 years, 10 months ago. Viewed 10k times. Currently I am getting a max fps of 18 : So my question is does anyone know of an efficient way to scale the SDL display to the screen resolution?

sdl scale texture

David Saxon David Saxon 1, 10 10 silver badges 23 23 bronze badges. Also ask the guys on the gamedev forum, they should be able to help you. Yes I am that's why it is so inefficient. But currently I can't find any other way of doing it that works. Ok will do. Just scale the loaded texture store that in memory and then delete the large texture from memory.

It's not likely that the user is going to be changing the scale they are running at while running the game.


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